Bamyan in afghanistan predating european

Scientists from around the world have since embarked on a painstaking process to collect the remnants of the dynamited statues and reconstruct them.

Seen in a 2005 photo, a towering alcove in Afghanistan's Bamian Valley cliffs shows the former home of a giant Buddha statue. D., the statue was one of a pair destroyed by Taliban officials in 2001 for allegedly insulting Islam. About 50 contain the depictions of ornate swirling patterns, Buddhist imagery, and mythological animals that led UNESCO to name the area a World Heritage site. As part of that venture, the scientists conducted the first scientific analysis of the paintings since the 1920s.

Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed that some of the murals contained oil- and resin-based paints—likely the earliest known use of either substance for painting.

A Buddhist mural dated to around the seventh century A. is one of many in Afghanistan's Bamian Valley that were recently found to contain oil- and resin-based paints.

"Only tyrants can take a nation to war without the consent of the people.

The planned war against Iraq without a Declaration of War is illegal.

It is unwise because of many unforeseen consequences that are likely to result.

It is immoral and unjust, because it had nothing to do with United States security and because Iraq had not initiated aggression against us." Congressman Ron Paul (How true that statement has proved to be).

February 6, 2008—A newly discovered mural is one of many in 12 of Afghanistan's famed Bamian caves that show evidence of an oil-based binder.

The binder was used to dry paint and help it adhere to rocky surfaces.

Afghanistan's Bamian cliffs are probably best known for once holding two enormous Buddha statues, as seen in this February 2001 image.

Just one month after this photo was taken, Taliban officials began to destroy the mighty carvings as part of a hard-line crackdown on anything they considered anti-Islamic and idolatrous.

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